Posts Tagged Thai cooking class

Home-Made Mango Jam

So with the weather getting nicer and nicer these days- especially when¬†this comes from a Southern Californian, it means REALLY nice weather. Like, totally! ūüėČ There are¬†lots of fresh ripe fruits to enjoy. With eyes bigger than the belly, sometimes, you might end up with lots of mangos like I did.¬†¬†I love eating them on their own. If I have leftovers, poof! they become mango lassi. It is the best breakfast ever.¬†Super¬†yummy and rich in nutrients. The¬†other best thing to do with extra mangos is making home-made mango jam. I have the recipe for you below, as well ideas¬†on how to enjoy this lovely jam.

Here are a some ideas how to enjoy mango jam.

1. Straight on a piece of toast.

2. Brie en croute.

3. Bruscetta with goat cheese and mango jam. (This is particularly¬†yum for h’ors d’oeuvres!!)

Ingredients:

6 cups of ripe mango, peeled, stoned, cut and mashed (I love the Kent variety.)

1.5 cups of sugar (or 1 cup agave nectar, or 1 cup honey)

1 pouch powder pectin (gives it the spreadable consistency)

1/2 Tsp. lime zest

3 limes, juiced

Directions:

1. Prepare the mango as mentioned above, peel, stone, cut and mashed. Use caution- it can be slippery.

2. Mix pectin with 1/2 cup of sugar to help prevent from clumping once in the fruit mixture. If you are not using sugar, you just have to make sure to stir really well, so the pectin doesn’t clump up.

3. In a large pot, add the prepared mango, lime juice and zest, and cook on medium heat. Add the sugar and pectin mixture. Stir well.

4. Bring to a rolling boil. Then, add the rest of the sugar and stir well. Cook for 8-10 more minutes. Stirring consistantly.

5. Ladel into pasteurized jars. Let sit and cool at room temperature for 24 hours. Once opened, stays refrigerated for upto 3 weeks.

This recipe tastes very tropical with the addition of lime juice and zest. I am going to try and add some Thai chili peppers to it next time, so it can be used on savory foods as well.  

Yummmm!

Mango and Lime.

LOVE the color!!

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The chicken wings I’ve been telling you about.

In the post about my Thai Grilled Chicken Wings, I never took or posted the final pictures of the wings, because my hands were occupied grilling them and serving afterwards. This time, I had to make sure to bust out my phone to snap a quick shot for you! Hope you will try the recipe this summer!  

Better late than never, ha? ūüėÄ Remember to make a refreshing salad to go with it, too.

Thai it, you’ll love it!!

Til then..

Chicken wings.

Garlic, black pepper corn, cilantro roots and fish sauce marinated chicken wings

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Little Saigon – Foodie’s Paradise

Where do I buy all of my intimidating/exotic/God-knows-what-it-is¬†ingredients for the classes and recipes I share with you?? I go to a few places- 99 Ranch Market off of Jeffrey (5 freeway), Little Saigon in Westminster, and Laguna Niguel Farmer’s market¬†which I posted a blog about earlier this month. Although, it might seem daunting to take on this challenge and go shopping for Thai ingredients in the beginning, you will slooooowly start to recongize things and become more open to the adventure of what you might find each time. Come on, give it a Thai! ūüôā (I’m just enjoying the Thai-try play on words too too¬†much!!)

Live crab in a tank

Does it get fresher than this? ūüėČ

Jasmine tea.

These, my friends, are banana blossoms… I know whatcha thinkin’. They are kind of exotic. ūüėÄ

An alternative for our same old latte. ūüėČ

If you have taken my class, I don't want you anywhere near these! You know how to make them from scratch!

Some of my groceries. Fresh fruits and veggies are mmm mmm good!

Always remember, Thai it, you’ll like it! ūüėÄ

Ciaociao!

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Step by step – how to clean cilantro roots for Thai cooking.

Cilantro is a fragrant herb that can light up a blah dish. The leaves are delicate and are usualy used for garnishing. Did you know that the roots have even stronger aroma but have the strength to withstand mashing and heat and deliver that aroma to many of your culinary creations? A good example, if you make your own chicken stock, try using the roots when you add the celery, onion and carrot for the mirepoix. The mashed roots will take the stock to another level. Cilantro root is good excellent for killing fishy smells. So next time you marinate fish, try a root in your marinate. Your fish will smell like roses.. Just kidding. They will smell noticably fresh.

In superstores, cilantro comes with their roots chopped off. If you buy it at your local farmers market, you will have better luck. See the following pictures on how to clean them up. The good news is that they freeze so well, that you can store them for months of usage.

As always, Thai it, you’ll like it!! ūüėČ

Cut them about 4 inches from the base of the stems.

See the dirty roots? That's what we're cleaning.

Run a pairing knife up and down the surface of the roots. That is my attempt to make it look like I am moving. ūüėõ

See the difference??

Repeat until finish and rinse well. Then, dry on a kitchen towel. Store in a zip top bag and freeze.

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Thai Cooking Instructor on a Not-So-Spicy Day

I usually get a “wow!”, “yum!” or ” looks soooo good!” for my culinary creations. And I’d better, if I want to teach Thai cooking classes. However, there¬†ARE¬†times when eating, let alone cooking, becomes overrated. Today is one of those rare days that I could only spend literally¬†2 minutes on the production and a couple of minutes on the destruction (eating ;)).¬†So I returned to one of the classics and it turned out so YUM that I will be repeating. I made a sandwich with peanut butter, Nutella (aka Heaven in a Jar) and banana slices. This is how it looks. Not too shabby ha?

Quite YUM, I must say...

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